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COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

What do I do when I arrive for my COVID-19 test?

When you arrive for your test, please make sure to wear a mask and bring your ID.

How do I reschedule/cancel my COVID-19 appointment?

To reschedule or cancel your COVID-19 test appointment, reply to the confirmation text message sent to you when you booked your test, following the instructions provided in the text.

How will I receive my COVID-19 test results?

You will receive your COVID-19 test result in either a phone call or text message.

When will I receive my COVID-19 test results?

Turnaround times for test results may vary, but patients are currently receiving their results three business days after day of test.

What happens if I test negative for COVID-19?

A negative result means that on the day you were tested you did not have COVID-19 infection. If you develop symptoms or have a exposure to someone with COVID-19, stay home and call to schedule another COVID-19 test.

What happens if I test positive for COVID-19?

You will receive a phone call from LifeLong if you test positive with instructions on how to quarantine safely and what day your quarantine ends. We will ask you for a list of people you have been in contact with and review any symptoms you might be experiencing.

There have been recent reports of scam calls pertaining to COVID-19. Please be aware that LifeLong's staff will always identify themselves and will not ask you for your personal information like social security number or credit card information.

What if I develop symptoms or my symptoms get worse?

If you have mild symptoms, you should continue to quarantine at home. If your symptoms get worse, please call LifeLong at (510) 981-4100 to schedule a telephone visit with a provider. If you feel you need to go to the Emergency Room, wear a mask and notify anyone caring for you that you have tested positive for COVID-19.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

For more information from the CDC: English | Español

How does COVID-19 spread?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in many affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

For more information from the CDC: English | Español

How can I prevent getting COVID-19 or spreading it to others?

  • Maintain good social distance (about 6 feet). This is very important in preventing the spread of COVID-19.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Routinely clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when around others.

For more information from the CDC: English | Español

Who is most at risk for COVID-19?

Everyone is at risk for getting COVID-19 if they are exposed to the virus. Some people are more likely than others to become severely ill, which means that they may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or they may even die. We learn more about COVID-19 every day, and as more information becomes available, we will continue to update and share information about risk for severe illness.

People at increased risk for severe illness:

  • Older Adults
  • People with Underlying Medical Conditions
  • People of any age with the following conditions are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19:

    • Cancer
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
    • Obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 30 or higher)
    • Serious heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
    • Sickle cell disease
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Based on what we know at this time, people with the following conditions might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

    • Asthma (moderate-to-severe)
    • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
    • Cystic fibrosis
    • Hypertension or high blood pressure
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, or use of other immune weakening medicines
    • Neurologic conditions, such as dementia
    • Liver disease
    • Pregnancy
    • Pulmonary fibrosis (having damaged or scarred lung tissues)
    • Smoking
    • Thalassemia (a type of blood disorder)
    • Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    For more information from the CDC: English | Español

What do I do if someone in my house has COVID-19?

  • Help cover basic needs
    • Help the person who is sick follow their doctor’s instructions for care and medicine.
    • For most people, symptoms last a few days, and people usually feel better after a week.
    • See if over-the-counter medicines for fever help the person feel better.
    • Make sure the person who is sick drinks a lot of fluids and rests.
    • Help them with grocery shopping, filling prescriptions, and getting other items they may need. Consider having the items delivered through a delivery service, if possible.
  • If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:
    • Trouble breathing
    • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
    • New confusion
    • Inability to wake or stay awake
    • Bluish lips or face
  • Limit contact
  • Eat in separate rooms or areas
  • Avoid sharing personal items
  • For more information from the CDC: English | Español

    How do I clean my home if someone has COVID-19?

    • Wear reusable or disposable gloves for routine cleaning and disinfection.
    • Clean surfaces using soap and water, then use disinfectant.
    • Clean or launder items according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.
    • If someone is sick, keep a separate bedroom and bathroom for the person who is sick (if possible).

    For more information from the CDC: English | Español

    Who needs to quarantine?

    People who have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19—excluding people who have had COVID-19 within the past 3 months.

    People who have tested positive for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to 3 months as long as they do not develop symptoms again. People who develop symptoms again within 3 months of their first bout of COVID-19 may need to be tested again if there is no other cause identified for their symptoms.

    What counts as close contact?

    • You were within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more
    • You provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19
    • You had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them)
    • You shared eating or drinking utensils
    • They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you
    • Steps to take

      • Stay home and monitor your health
      • Stay home for 14 days after your last contact with a person who has COVID-19
      • Watch for fever (100.4◦F), cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19
      • If possible, stay away from others, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19

      For more information from the CDC: English | Español

    If I am undocumented, can I get tested for COVID-19?

    Don’t let fear stop you from getting necessary treatment, as the effects of avoiding health care services may be very serious. This will help keep you, your family, and your community healthy.

    If you’re undocumented or don’t have insurance, you can still get needed COVID-19 testing and treatment at no cost. Medi-cal care for COVID-19 related testing or treatment alone DOES NOT count under the public charge rule.

    For more information: English | Español

    Is it safe to get COVID-19 medical services due to public charge?

    Effective July 29, 2020, a federal court ruling prohibits the application and enforcement of the public charge rule that went into effect on February 24, 2020. The ruling is currently in effect so long as there is a declared national emergency related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Don’t let fear stop you from getting necessary treatment, as the effects of avoiding health care services may be very serious. This will help keep you, your family, and your community healthy.

    If you’re undocumented or don’t have insurance, you can still get needed COVID-19 testing and treatment at no cost. Medi-cal care for COVID-19 related testing or treatment alone DOES NOT count under the public charge rule.

    For more information: English | Español

    What if I am pregnant, caring for a newborn, or breastfeeding?

    Based on what we know at this time, pregnant people might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 compared to non-pregnant people. Additionally, pregnant people with COVID-19 may be at increased risk for other adverse outcomes, such as preterm birth.

    • Take steps to protect yourself from COVID-19
    • Don’t skip your healthcare appointments during and after pregnancy.
    • Don’t delay getting emergency care because of COVID-19.

    Caring for newborns when the mother has COVID-19

    • Decide if your newborn is rooming-in with you in the hospital.
    • Take precautions when having your newborn stay in the same room with you, if you are in isolation for COVID-19.
    • Take precautions at home if you are in isolation for COVID-19.
    • Do not put a face shield or mask on your baby.
    • Bring your baby for newborn visits.

    COVID-19 and breastfeeding:

    • Current evidence suggests that breast milk isn’t likely to spread the virus to babies.
    • If you have COVID-19 and choose to breastfeed: Wash your hands beforehand. Wear a mask while breastfeeding.
    • If you have COVID-19 and choose to express breast milk: Use a dedicated breast pump (not shared).

    For more information: English | Español

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